Artist Statement

Paul's primary motivation is to contribute to the evolving field of environmental art and to encourage discussion around often polemical environmental issues in Canada, such as ecological fragmentation and the ethics of agricultural production.

Paul engages these issues through the construction of sculptural support apparatuses built from carefully chosen and assembled objects, which he then populates with living collaborators (referring to the plants and worms involved). Repurposing objects as habitats and conceptual support systems subverts and re-contextualizes them as players in functioning ecosystems. Paul also bears in mind that the living elements in the works are the biological foundation upon which human societies are built. He considers the plants and other natural elements as having agency of their own; shown through their power to change the appearance and effect of the work. By creating living and breathing indoor systems, his work visualize meaningful facsimiles which evoke the complicated environmental and cultural issues which are present outside the exhibition space, but on a more comprehensible scale for the sake of engaging a viewer more substantially.

    Tending the living collaborators generates a productive exchange with the viewer, and that is inherently subversive and political; an act of caregiving in opposition to the dominance of the apathetic consumerism of industrially produced food. Whether by feeding political documents to worms for composting, or feeding human participants with the sustenance grown within the projects, Paul's hope is to foster a dialogue for critiquing broader societal views of the problematic nature/human dichotomy.

 

 

 

Fluxus Garden 2013

Fluxus Garden 2013